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Guest Blog: Dr. Tony Ebel – Part 1
18 May, 2015. 0 Comments. Uncategorized. Posted By: Dr. Tyler Perkins

Dr_-Anthony-EbelIt’s still just plain crazy to me that I even have to write about this. The understanding and facts behind this topic are so clear, and have been for so long, that I just can’t believe everyone doesn’t know this yet. It’s appalling parents aren’t given the facts because the research is clear.

What am I talking about? I’m talking about the clear, and all too commonly seen path from childhood ear infections to lifelong asthma and immune challenges.

It starts with the way we birth and deliver babies

This should be, and will be, a whole paper on it’s own… but for this topic, let’s keep it simple. For thousands of years kids were brought into this world WITHOUT the need for “intervention and induction” and also WITH the help of gravity. Was every birth perfect and non-complicated? Nope. But 30-40% or more of them didn’t end with anesthesia, surgical tools, and a baby being pulled out by their head and neck either.

I’m starting off talking about the birth process, because it’s where the most common injury to the upper neck, brainstem, and cranial areas occurs. It’s the first “kink” that occurs, and it sets the stage for the rest of the path to develop. As you’ll see, one problem leads to another, and it just keeps going.

When there is strain, tension, pulling and stress placed on the child’s head and neck during the birth process, it very commonly leads to something called a subluxation. I like to explain subluxation as having three parts – misalignment, fixation (“stuck”), and nerve interference/irritation. All three of those components are at play in this situation.

The greater the amount of intervention during the birth process (induction, forceps, vacuum, C-section, etc.), the greater the likelihood of a significant subluxation to the upper neck and brain stem area. Is it an ‘absolute’ situation? No, few things are… but in my 7 years of clinical experience, I can tell you it’s a very, very strong correlation.

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Dr. Tyler Perkins

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